Ongoing Genocide caused by Judicial Suppression of the "Existing" Aboriginal Rights

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Ongoing Genocide

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 In ten succinct and very readable articles, Dr. Clark shows that constitutional fraud and usurpation-as-genocide continue as the modus operandi of the Canadian settler-state.

Described by the Secwepemc traditionalist elder Wolverine as “the most dangerous lawyer in Canada,” Clark exposes the method of this country's ongoing imposition of conditions calculated to bring about the destruction of native groups; causing physical and mental harm; and committing genocide.
 

About the book:

Ongoing Genocide caused by Judicial Suppression of the "Existing" Aboriginal Rights

 Sergeant Dennis Ryan of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police representing the Gustafsen Lake Crisis Management Team in September 1995 stated: "Kill this Clark, smear the prick and everyone with him."

Why? “The very foundations that Canadian society is built upon are threatened here,” is the answer the RCMP spokesperson gave in an interview at the time. The history of those "very foundations," and the true nature of what "is threatened here," is the subject of Ongoing Genocide.

Clark was described by one of his clients, the Secwepemc traditionalist elder Wolverine, as “the most dangerous lawyer in Canada.” This opinion was shared by the RCMP, the provincial and federal governments, the bench, bar and Chief Justice of Canada and even the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations.

A concerted and comprehensive “smear and disinformation campaign” across the national media was revealed, at trial, to have been conducted against Clark, Wolverine and the other traditionalists and Sundancers involved in the month long 1995 armed standoff at Gustafsen Lake.

Clark was officially demonized, disbarred and destroyed because of what he knows and what he can prove. And what he can prove is that Constitutional fraud and usurpation-as-genocide continues to be the modus operandi of the Canadian judiciary.

He spent forty-six years defending the rights of Natives across North America. A scholar specializing in the legal history of the evolving relationship between Natives and Newcomers, he holds an MA in constitutional history and a PhD in comparative jurisprudence and is the author of Native Liberty, Crown Sovereignty and Justice in Paradise (McGill-Queen’s University Press).

The ten essays in Ongoing Genocide caused by Judicial Suppression of the "Existing" Aboriginal Rights deal with aspects of the "genocide"—within the meaning of section 2(b) of the United Nations' genocide convention—of Indigenous peoples in Canada. That section indicts the imposition of "serious bodily or mental harm" against groups, such as that evidenced by the high rates of suicides of Indians in reaction to the courts' injustices, committed for political reasons contrary to the rule of law.

Much of Clark's awareness of the "serious bodily or mental harm" meted out by the court system's injustices comes from the fact he lived for twelve years on Indian reservations in northern Canada. He and his wife Margaret raised their three children there and were witnesses to the loss of lives attributable to the stress to which the young people in particular were vulnerable.

The appendix—entitled "Judicial Culpability for War and Genocide in the Age of American Empire"—deals with the failure of the North American Judiciary to enforce the constitutional provisions prohibiting international war except in self defense to an attack. The lessons learned and practiced on the Natives of North America are exported to the global village, a surrogate Indian country, and the judges do nothing to prevent this pursuant to the rule of law, which it is their constitutional duty to uphold.

The cause of the genocidal suppression of existing constitutional law is the criminal politicization of the judiciary. Pointing this out to the courts led to the conviction of the author for criminal contempt of court and disbarment for "conduct unbecoming" a barrister and solicitor.

Since then the judicial ignoring of existing constitutional law, for political reasons, has become further entrenched.
 

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Read Reviews of this book

 "Bruce Clark's rigorous analysis of the genocidal unconstitutionality of Canada's treatment of the native peoples and appropriation of their land is a great service in the pursuit of truth and justice. The essays in this book document the abandonment by the legal establishment (judges and lawyers) of the principle of the rule of law, 

in the service of Empire. 

 - Joseph Hickey, M.Sc., Executive Director of the Ontario Civil Liberties Association

Go to book reviews

Other books by Bruce Clark

Native Liberty, Crown Sovereignty: The Existing Aboriginal Right of Self-Government in Canada

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The cornerstone of Clark's argument is the 1763 Royal Proclamation which forbade non-natives under British authority to molest or disturb any tribe or tribal territory in British North America. Clark contends that this proclamation had legislative force and that, since imperial law on this matter has never been repealed, the right to self-government continues to exist for Canadian natives. 

Justice in Paradise

Cover of Justice in Paradise.

 Dr. Clark has made a career of defending native land claims in Canada and the US, based on legal arguments that the taking of native lands without purchase or treaty, by US and Canadian federal and/or state and provincial governments, has been unlawful. The argument is so open-and-shut, that courts refuse to hear it, since part of the argument is that the courts do not have jurisdiction. In over 40 cases, the court has refused to hear or respond to the argument. It is based on 18th century British constitutional law, which has not been repealed, and which is still in force in Canada and the USA. Starting with the Jackson administration in the US, the governments have simply decided to ignore the law on this matter. 

About the Author

Bruce Clark in front of the press during the 1995 Gustafsen Lake stand-off. 100 Mile House, BC.

BRUCE CLARK spent forty-six years defending the rights of Natives across North America. A scholar specializing in the legal history of the evolving relationship between Natives and Newcomers, he holds an MA in constitutional history and a PhD in comparative jurisprudence and is the author of Native Liberty, Crown Sovereignty and Justice in Paradise (McGill-Queen’s University Press).

The ten essays in Ongoing Genocide caused by Judicial Suppression of the "Existing" Aboriginal Rights deal with aspects of the "genocide"—within the meaning of section 2(b) of the United Nations' genocide convention—of Indigenous peoples in Canada. That section indicts the imposition of "serious bodily or mental harm" against groups, such as that evidenced by the high rates of suicides of Indians in reaction to the Newcomers' courts' injustices, committed for political reasons contrary to the rule of law.

The appendix—entitled "Judicial Culpability for War and Genocide in the Age of American Empire"—deals with the failure of the North American Judiciary to enforce the constitutional provisions prohibiting international war except in self defense to an attack. The lessons learned and practiced on the Natives of North America are exported to the global village, a surrogate Indian country, and the judges do nothing to prevent this pursuant to the rule of law, which it is their constitutional duty to uphold.

The cause of the genocidal suppression of existing constitutional law is the criminal politicization of the judiciary. Pointing this out to the courts led to the conviction of the author for criminal contempt of court and disbarment for "conduct unbecoming" a barrister and solicitor, in consequence of which the judicial ignoring of existing constitutional law, for political reasons, has become further entrenched.

Much of Clark's awareness of the "serious bodily or mental harm" meted out by the court system's injustices comes from the fact he lived for twelve years on Indian reservations in northern Canada. He and his wife Margaret raised their three children there and were witnesses to the loss of lives attributable to the stress to which the young people in particular were vulnerable.
 

Listen to Bruce Clark speak

Receiving the Ontario Civil Liberties Association Award

Clark receives OCLA Award